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11 Marines Booted From The Corps In The Wake Of The ‘Marines United’ Scandal — So Far

This article by Hope Hodge Seck originally appeared on Military.com, the premier source of information for the military and veteran community.

The Marine Corps continues to wade through prosecutions of active-duty troops found to have been involved in the swapping of nude photos of troops through the “Marines United” Facebook page last year, or other social media misconduct in a similar vein.

As of this month, 101 prosecutions have been completed, with 11 troops sent to court-martial, Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Glenn Walters said Tuesday. Walters, who was made head of initiatives to investigate the social media scandal and root out underlying cultural issues, told members of the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Services that, in all, the Marine Corps had identified 185 persons of interest suspected of social media misconduct, including 163 Marines and 22 civilians.

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Of the 101 dispositions complete as of Sept. 5, the results were as follows:

  • 3 general courts-martial
  • 6 special courts-martial
  • 2 summary courts-martial
  • 16 non-judicial punishments
  • 8 administrative separations
  • 29 adverse administrative actions
  • 37 cases concluded without formal adverse action

All of the courts-martial resulted in bad-conduct discharges, with defendants busted down to private and forced to forfeit all pay and benefits, Walters said.

For the larger number of Marines who received administrative adverse action, Walters said they likely still will see their careers ended over their actions.

“They got a 6105 [adverse counseling] in their record, which means if you’re a sergeant or below, you’re probably not going to have the cutting score required [to be promoted],” he said. “You know how tight the promotion boards are.”

It remains unclear exactly how many active-duty Marines shared or …read more

Read more here:: Task & Purpose

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